These wonderful, big fluffy chickens are perfect brooders. I've taken eggs from other hens, and given them to these Cochin mamas, and they smother them with love until they hatch, and then are some of the most attentive mothers a baby chick could have, even doing battle with some of my randy roosters and other hens looking to damage their young.
Cochins were imported to England from China in about 1845. Queen Victoria was given a pair as a gift, and, until then, were only found in the orient. Raised by royalty, and, just like the Panda, they were rarely seen outside of the mainland.
Well, someone in England figured it out, and soon chicks were hatching and were presented to important persons by the Queen, who was said to be very pleased with her little brood. They were all the rage. Until they figured out what they would do to gardens. When Cochins go after things, like roses, peonies, lavender and even rosemary, well it's not a pretty sight. My chickens even ate all my asparagus roots, rhubarb, artichoke and yes, horseradish. One chicken can do a lot of damage to a well-tended garden, in spite of the fact that they eat almost their weight in snails, slugs, bugs per week.
I have one golden feathered one, like on the left, several black ones, and one blue Cochin, really a beautiful silvery grey color.
Now why would I bring up Cochins on my stop at C on the blog tour? Yesterday, as a matter of fact, one of my Cochins was beside herself, clucking, looking for an egg she probably thought got eaten or stolen by another hen. She was grumpily pecking all the other hens in the yard while she continued to search for it, having conducted a thorough review of the henhouse.
I only know this because of what happened next. Normally this very sweet hen is no problem, but I knew she was miffed about something.
When she turned around, I saw her egg had gotten stuck in her feathers, and she was wearing it, carrying it around the yard while she told everyone else about her distress. She couldn't feel it, couldn't see it, so it had disappeared.
I laughed when I thought how often I have been clucking around about something, you know the drill, the muttering under the breath, sure someone else had done something to cause me this distress, only to later find out I did it to myself all by myself!
And how many times did I not listen to advice or feedback, or pay attention in a craft class or workshop, and suffer for it later on?
When I removed the brown egg from her feathers, I showed Ms. Cochin her progeny. She looked at it, pecked it, and then went on and I never heard another cluck all afternoon. Even chickens can be enlightened with the right teacher.
Who knew?
Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 6 comments
Jan Morrison - April 4, 2011

I love this! Probably because I'm a chicken rancher too. We're out of birds right now but just cleaning up the workshop for a clutch of day-olds so we can start again. I like australorpes probably for the same reason – nice mamas. see around the blogosphere!
Jan Morrison

robinofrockridge - April 4, 2011

This is an amusing blog, Sharon! Loved the comparison to ourselves when we're sure something is wrong/misplaced and tend to blame others. Maybe we need to look at our own feathers first.

Sharon Hamilton - April 4, 2011

Thought there was a good reason I liked your comments – another chicken lover! Whoo Hoo!

I have (I think) an Astralorpe mix rooster. I'll have to make it a point to try to get a hen. Isn't it just the best to watch them hatch? I have been known to spend days and days playing with my new baby chicks. (Shhh. Don't tell my agent).

Thanks for stopping by, and following.

Sharon Hamilton - April 4, 2011

I could have said "we need to check our own butts first" but I tried to say it in a more fluffy and girly way. Glad you enjoyed the post. I do learn a lot from chickens!

Sharon Hamilton - April 22, 2011

Don't you touch my girls!


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